Joint manipulation

When a physiotherapist manipulates a joint, it means we take the joint to its end of range and then we perform a quick thrust movement to which takes the joint past its normal range of movement. The reason behind passively manipulating joints is that it is an effective way to “free up” an acute locked …

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Ice and heat therapy

Ice therapy (cryotherapy) is the use of ice in the treatment of acute and chronic injuries. The application of ice is an important step in the RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) protocol following acute injuries. Ice is the recommended treatment modality immediately after an injury for its ability to reduce inflammation and swelling in the …

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Exercise programmes

Exercise prescription forms an integral part of most physiotherapy rehabilitation programmes. Exercise is essential to recovery from sports injuries, following surgery, after an acute trauma such as from a fall or fracture, in the management of acute and chronic low back pain, neck pain and headaches and in the treatment of long term conditions such …

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Dry Needling

The word acupuncture comes from the Latin word for needle (acus) and it means “puncturing of bodily tissue for the relief of pain”. Physiotherapy use of acupuncture in the form of dry needling is often confused with the Eastern medicine practice of acupuncture. While Chinese acupuncture is based on healing through correcting the energy flow …

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Achilles tendon injuries

A tendon is a band of tissue that connects muscle to bone. The Achilles tendon connects your calf muscles to your heel, allowing you to walk, run and jump. Achilles tendinopathy, the strain of the Achilles tendon, is a common injury that may affect runners, or people with overpronated (flat) feet or those with high …

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Disc prolapse

Commonly called “herniated disc” or “ruptured disc” (or misleadingly called “slipped disc”), one of the common conditions we treat is disc prolapse. The spinal column is made up of several bones called vertebrae. Between these vertebrae are discs which prevent the bones from rubbing against each other during movement and act as shock absorbers during …

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Back pain

Most people will suffer from back pain at some point in their lives. Back pain is common among athletes who strain their back muscles or it may be the result of spinal injuries such as fractures or sprains. Accidents, falls and direct blows to the back can also cause back pain. However, many people report …

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Ankle sprains

The ankle is the joint between the lower parts of the tibia and fibula (shin bones) and the tarsal bones at the back of the foot. It is crisscrossed by several ligaments that can become injured when the ankle has a sudden twist that stretches the ligaments beyond their normal range. The most common type …

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What is wrong with self-healing?

Nothing is wrong with self-healing; the human body has an amazing capacity for healing itself. In today’s emphasis on natural medicine, there are several schools of thought promoting self-healing on all levels, whether it be a simple bruise or cut, or a deeper psychological or physical trauma. In physiotherapy, we aim to assist the body …

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